Posts Tagged ‘xamarin’

React Native vs Xamarin

Friday, January 24th, 2020

With an overly increasing market for mobile applications in both of its major platforms- Android and iOS, it is only probable that the developers continue to hunt for a faster, a more comprehensive way of creating these. This is where open source cross-platform frameworks like React Native and Xamarin comes to play. With both these frameworks topping the charts in their fields it is only necessary to closely examine and compare their features so that the user is better equipped to make a choice.

If simple facts are to be believed then React native has about three times more users than Xamarin, on the various platforms where the users of these frameworks form communities and interact we can see a wide disparity in the number of people committed to one of the two, be it Github or Reddit. But this does not necessarily indicate better technical process. What it does show is that Facebook is making extra efforts in securing a community for its framework, a field where Microsoft effectively lacks.

If we examine the technical aspects of the two, we see the amount of ease of usage that React native provides to its customers- basic knowledge of the Java Script and you are ready to develop mobile apps. Xamarin, on the other hand, uses the C# language, which is more popular with the native users of Android or iOS.

This also introduces to one of the areas where React Native falls short of customer expectations is that it has no provisions for the native features of Android or iOS, the need to be created from scratch every time you have to include them in your development process, this tedious task compels you to write in both Java and Objective C. On the other hand, Xamarin offers no such problems.

As far as the need for emulators is concerned, in Xamarin one has the compulsion to integrate them in order create anything, whereas React native can function without it, but for a better or more complex application your work has to be integrated with these external emulators at the end.

Another area where React native has not been scoring high is the lack of maturity in its framework, it is easily susceptible to damage and prone to attack via bugs, etc. It has taken a lot of public heat, since often, these bugs are hard to fix, and time taken in doing so might range to days.

So, while React native might appear to be more lucrative a strong proposition can be made claiming that Xamarin with its impeccable centralized support among other things is a better boat to sail in for the long term.

What’s New in Xamarin Image Editor?

Thursday, January 23rd, 2020

The 2019 Volume 3 release of Xamarin.Forms Image Editor introduced several improvements, thereby allowing users such as top UX design firms an enhanced experience. Below, we take a close look at the new features which were added this year:

Image filter effects support

This effect enables users to choose from a wide range of color filters that can be added to their image. In other words, the original colors of the image are manipulated to achieve a different texture and color. There are six types of options that users have access to, including Hue, Saturation, Brightness, Contrast, Blur, and Sharpen. Users can apply these effects either by using the Image Editor toolbar or through code using the ApplyImageEffect method.

While the hue refers to the dominant wavelength of an image’s color, and its value ranges from -180 to 180, saturation refers to the intensity of the color. Its value ranges from -100 to 100. The brightness of an image represents how bright the image’s color is, with its value ranging between -100 and 100. The contrast of an image means the difference between the colors of an image. Its value ranges between -100 and 100.

Blur, on the other hand, means the clarity of an image, and its effect ranges from 0 to 6. Finally, the Sharpen feature is used for highlighting and enhancing the edges of objects found in an image. Its value ranges from 0 to 6 as well.

You even have the option of creating your own image color style in the new Xamarin Image Editor. All you have to do is apply a combination of various filter effects to your image.

Option for adding read-only text

The 2019 Volume 3 release of Xamarin Image Editor allows users to add read-only text to images. To do so, it restricts the text pop-up while you tap on an added text. If you want to add read-only text, you have to set the IsEditable property in TextSettings to false (which is set in true by default) before you add the text to the image.

Option to enable or disable resize functionality for added objects

Users now have the option of enabling or disabling the resize functionality for added objects, including images, shapes, as well as custom views. To do so, you have to use the IsResizable property of PenSettings, TextSettings, as well as CustomViewSettings in the Image Editor.

Apart from these main new features, there have also been several minor improvements made to Xamarin Image Editor, along with bug fixes.

Benefits of React Native vs Xamarin: An Easy Comparison Guide

Thursday, January 23rd, 2020

React Native and Xamarin both offer their own sets of pros and cons when it comes to cross-platform app development. Which one is right for you?

Today, React Native and Xamarin are among the most popular tools used for cross-platform app development. But how do you know which one is the right choice for your project?

Using the right tools is critical for app developers because it affects the usability and success of the app. Especially for apps that are to be available on both iOS and Android, seamless functioning on both platforms can be achieved with the right tool.

To help you make the right choice, we compare React Native and Xamarin on various criteria below:

Availability

React Native is completely free, even for businesses. It is an open-source JavaScript-based framework. It also has a very large developer community compared to Xamarin.

Xamarin is also open-source. However, despite there being a free version, you need to spend for enterprise-level applications because the free version doesn’t do much.

Market share

React Native is widely used by tons of top graphic designing companies as well as corporations worldwide, including Fortune500 companies. The Guardian, Skype, Facebook, Walmart, and Tesla are just a few of the companies that use React Native.

For the past six years, Xamarin has been used by tens of thousands of companies everywhere, right from startups to huge corporations. Notable apps such as CA Mobile and Story have been developed using Xamarin. Top UX design firms have built many successful apps and websites using this tool.

Code compilation

For developing apps for Android, React Native uses JIT (Just-in-time) compilation. However, this is not applicable for iOS apps as Apple does not allow dynamically generated codes to be executed on its devices. So, React Native has no option but to interpret the JavaScript code.

When it comes to code compilation, a top app design agency would prefer Xamarin. This is because it uses C# as its codebase, which uses JIT compilation for Android apps while using AOT (Ahead-of-Time) compilation for iOS apps. Thus, compiling managed codes is much easier.

Development environment

React Native allows developers to use an IDE and text editor that they are comfortable with. It also has a Live Reload feature, whereby developers can see the effects of the changes they have made in real-time.

Xamarin is a winner here because of how user-friendly it is, allowing developers to write code on both Windows and iPhone app. The code can be later compiled on a Mac after writing on Windows.

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