Posts Tagged ‘API testing’

API Automation with Rest Assured

Monday, June 29th, 2020

Introduction of Rest API

Rest-Assured is a Java-based library that is used to test RESTful Web Services. We can build a customized HTTP Request to send to the Restful server. This allows us to test a variety of Request permutations and in turn test various combinations of main business logic.

Rest-Assured library also provides the capability to authenticate the HTTP Responses accepted from the server. For e.g. we can verify the Status code, Status message, Headers and even the body of the response.

What is Rest Assured?

REST Assured library is the best tool to automate your rest api’s. Rest Assured has a gherkin type syntax.

List of few Rest Assured features:

  • DSL-like syntax
  • XPath-Validation
  • Specification Reuse
  • Easy file uploads 

All these features support in handling api tests in a very well managed way.

Why Are We Using Rest Assured?

REST Assured offers a number of other useful features for writing tests for RESTful APIs. Let’s take a look at some of them.

  • Technical response data validation
  • Data-driven testing
  • Support for authentication mechanisms

The benefits of REST Assured

Aspects of REST Assured which makes it a most appropriate library for API testing:

  • In traditional development we have to write a large amount of code to set up http connection, send a request and receive and parse the response, while with the rest assured a lot of boilerplate code is not required to be written.
  • Since REST Assured is a Java library, integrating it into a continuous integration / continuous delivery setup is a breeze, especially when combined with a Java testing framework such as JUnit or TestNG


Challenges behind API Automation Testing:

Initial Setup

Foremost obstacle in any automation testing is initial setup. If the initial setup is too much complicated, then enthusiasm goes down as the time passes. Most people, even companies, put automation testing on hold or leave in the middle and proceed with the manual testing. This is one of the major blockers in automation of the testing process. If initial setup is easy-going, then implementation of the testing framework / tool will be much easier and highly achievable.

Maintenance

Second major barrier is maintenance. Once you have created your test suites for any release. Then the query comes in your mind, is it easy to maintain those test suites over a period of releases? If improving those test suites takes a good amount of effort, then it is worse than the manual testing. If upgrading time is less than we can easily maintain those test suites.

Management

Third obstacle is management and is to some extent related to maintenance. Management makes the tasks of organizing test suites easier and more maintainable. If you have linked your API test cases with API Specifications, then proper management can give you answers to the questions like whether your API is fully tested or not.

Skilled Resources

Fourth hurdle is skills required to use the library / tool. If we adopt a tool / library, then we should have people having those skills set required for the usage of the tool. In the range of REST API, we can benefit from the tools in which no technical skills are required to validate REST APIs because REST APIs are platform independent and language agnostic.

Integration with existing ecosystem

Fifth hurdle is integration with the existing ecosystem. It is important to know how well the library / tool integrates with your build or defect tracking system (or any other). Whenever you prepare a new build, it should fire the automated test suite first and if all the test cases pass, only then the build is ready to be released in the market. And if the validation fails, then your automated test suite should automatically log bugs against the failed test cases.

Status Codes in API Testing

Friday, June 19th, 2020

What is API?

API is an Application Programming Interface. It is an interface among software and within the software. To understand it we must go through a basic example as a user.

To get to know the API, follow the below steps:

  • Let us suppose a user is on ‘You Tube’ and observes the URL field on the screen. If a user enters any keyword for which the user wishes to view the video, say ‘Hello’ and click on the search button. The API of the videos related to’ hello ‘will get hit and users may observe the part after youtube.com/{This}.
  • If the user clicks any video from the page again, he/she will observe the API’s being hit at that moment. So, what is basically happening here?
  • The user is requesting a request from a provider and it is giving back the required response. Some of the times it happens that there is a working site say ‘www.ABC.com users search it and its API gets hit, it opens.

What are Status Codes?

  • Now if the company ‘ABC’ changes its name to ‘ABD’ and the user enters the same old URL which has not yet been redirected to the new company name it will show an error ‘Page not found‘.
  • How can users view it? For more understanding, right-click on the screen, Select ‘inspect’ and click on the ‘console’ tab. It will display a 404 page not found. These results tell us the responses are known as status codes.

Status Codes are the HTTP RESPONSE standard status code.

What are some common API status codes?

Status codes are divided into 5 categories:

  • 1xx – Informational messages
  • 2xx – Success messages
  • 3xx – Redirection messages
  • 4xx – Client error
  • 5xx – Server error

To understand categories of status codes in API’s testing, let us think of a way the user can easily catch. Consider a website, the screen user can view with the eyes is the user interface.

On this website, there is a page where the user can add its details to create the account.

Users enter fields such as ‘Name’,’ DOB’ (and other personal details) and click on ‘Submit’. Now considering the above scenario, we can understand status codes.

  • If during the submit request, which was received and understood. It requests the response consuming resource to wait for a final response. Just an information message while the request continues to proceed are Information messages.
  • When the request is requested by the client was received, understood and accepted. It states as Success messages.
  • If while entering the Name field which has a validation to accept only 15 alphabets, user-entered more than that and submit the request. On the UI, an error message is displayed. Now, this error was caused by the client. hence Client error.
  • If during the submit request, the server is unable to perform the request due to any situation, that is known as Server-side error.
  • For a Redirection message, the website name changes its name to ‘www.AND.com’ and you enter the same old URL which has not yet been redirected to the new website name, this is the case for redirection found.

Conclusion

APIs are a means by which two different programs can communicate within the software and among software’s and status codes are the responses that are the results of the requests sent.

What is an API?

Thursday, June 4th, 2020

API is an acronym for Application Programming Interface.

It enables communication and data exchange between two separate software systems. A software system implementing an API contains functions/subroutines which can be executed by another software system.

What is API Testing?

API Testing is entirely different from GUI Testing and mainly concentrates on the business logic layer of the software architecture. This testing won’t concentrate on the look and feel of an application.

Instead of using standard user inputs(keyboard) and outputs, in API Testing, you use software to send calls to the API, get output, and note down the system’s response.

API Testing requires an application to interact with API. In order to test an API, you will need to

  • Use Testing Tool to drive the API
  • Write your own code to test the API

Set-up of API Test environment

  • API Testing is different from other software testing types as GUI is not available, and yet you are required to set up an initial environment that invokes API with a required set of parameters and then finally examines the test result.
  • Hence, Setting up a testing environment for API testing seems a little complex.
  • Database and server should be configured as per the application requirements.
  • Once the installation is done, the API Function should be called to check whether that API is working.

Types of Output of an API

An output of API could be:

  1. Any type of data
  2. Status (say Pass or Fail)
  3. Call another API function.

Test Cases for API Testing:

Test cases of API testing are based on:

  • Return value based on input conditionit is relatively easy to test, as input can be defined and results can be authenticated.
  • Does not return anythingWhen there is no return value, the behavior of the API on the system to be checked.
  • Trigger some other API/event/interruptIf an output of an API triggers some event or interrupt, then those events and interrupt listeners should be tracked.
  • Update data structureUpdating data structure will have some outcome or effect on the system, and that should be authenticated
  • Modify certain resourcesIf API call modifies some resources then it should be validated by accessing respective resources.

Approach of API Testing

Following points helps the user to do API Testing approach:

  1. Understanding the functionality of the API program and clearly defining the scope of the program.
  2. Apply testing techniques such as equivalence classes, boundary value analysis, and error guessing and write test cases for the API.
  3. Input Parameters for the API need to be planned and defined appropriately.
  4. Execute the test cases and compare expected and actual results.

How to do API Testing

API testing should cover at least following testing methods apart from usual SDLC process:

  • Discovery TestingThe test group should manually execute the set of calls documented in the API like verifying that a specific resource exposed by the API can be listed, created and deleted as appropriate.
  • Usability Testing – This testing verifies whether the API is functional and user-friendly. And does API integrate well with another platform as well.
  • Security TestingThis testing includes what type of authentication is required and whether sensitive data is encrypted over HTTP or both.
  • Automated TestingAPI testing should culminate in the creation of a set of scripts or a tool that can be used to execute the API regularly.
  • DocumentationThe test team has to make sure that the documentation is adequate and provides enough information to interact with the API. Documentation should be a part of the final deliverable

Best Practices of API Testing

  • Test cases should be grouped by test category.
  • On top of each test, you should include the declarations of the APIs being called.
  • Parameters selection should be explicitly mentioned in the test case itself.
  • Prioritize API function calls so that it will be easy for testers to test.
  • Each test case should be as self-contained and independent from dependencies as possible.
  • Avoid “test chaining” in your development.
  • Special care must be taken while handling one-time call functions like – Delete, CloseWindow, etc…
  • Call sequencing should be performed and well planned.
  • To ensure complete test coverage, create test cases for all possible input combinations of the API.

Types of Bugs that API testing detects

  • Fails to handle error conditions gracefully.
  • Unused flags
  • Missing or duplicate functionality.
  • Reliability Issues. Difficulty in connecting and getting a response from API.
  • Security Issues
  • Multi-threading issues.
  • Performance Issues. API response time is very high.
  • Improper errors/warning to a caller.
  • Incorrect handling of valid argument values.
  • Response Data is not structured correctly (JSON or XML).

Tools for API testing

Since API and Unit Testing both target source code, tools/frameworks can be used for their automation.

  • Parasoft SOAtest
  • Runscope
  • Postman
  • Curl
  • Cfix
  • Check
  • CTESK
  • dotTEST
  • Eclipse SDK tool- Automated API testing

Check out top API Testing Tools List

Challenges of API Testing

Challenges of API testing includes:

  • Main challenges in Web API testing are Parameter Combination, Parameter Selection, and Call Sequencing.
  • There is no GUI available to test the application which makes it difficult to give input values.
  • Validating and Verifying the output in a different system is little difficult for testers.
  • Parameters selection and categorization is required to be known to the testers.
  • Exception handling function needs to be tested
  • Coding knowledge is necessary for testers

Conclusion:

API consists of a set of classes/functions/procedures which represent the business logic layer. If the API is not tested properly, it may cause problems not only in the API application but also in the calling application. It is an indispensable test in software engineering.

Cross Browser Testing

Thursday, June 4th, 2020

What Is Cross Browser Testing?

Cross Browser Testing is a type of testing to verify if an application works across different browsers as expected and degrades gracefully.

It is the process of verifying your application’s compatibility with different browsers.

Many times, I have encountered an issue with a website and on calling the technical support, they simply tell me to try it in another browser? When I do, it works and I end up feeling like a total idiot, even though I earn my living working in the software industry. 

Introduction

We all might have observed that some websites are not properly displayed on some browsers and we just think that the website is broken. But, as soon as you open it on a different browser, the website opens just fine. This behavior explains the compatibility of a website with different browsers.

Each browser interprets the information on the website page differently. Thus, some browsers may lack the features that your website is trying to show and make your website look broken on that browser.

With the advancement in technology, there are several options available for browsers, and it’s not just enough to make a website work on one of the browsers.

Users should not be restricted to use any specific browser to access your application. Thus, it becomes necessary to test your website’s compatibility with different browsers. Some of the commonly used browsers include Chrome, Safari, Firefox, Internet Explorer etc.

Why Is It Performed?

For that matter, why is any kind of testing done?

  • To know what is wrong and be able to fix it.
  • To enhance efficiency and user experience and thereby, business.
  • To be informed of any possible pitfalls.

But specifically, if we think: What is the intent of cross-browser testing? – This is twofold.

  • The rendition or appearance of the page in different browsers- is it the same, is it different, if one is better than the other, etc.
  • The functionality and the working of it. (Of course!)

Who Performs cross browser Testing?

  • Are you thinking, “There are a million browsers, versions and platforms out there – which ones to choose?” This, thankfully, is not a decision that is the tester’s responsibility. The client, business analysis team and the marketing teams have a major role in this decision. Also, companies collect usage/traffic statistics to narrow down what browsers, environment and devices are mostly in use.
  • The entire project team should have an invested interest, time, money and infrastructure to support this endeavor.
  • The QA team can be involved in this process or it might be the design team who are keen on knowing how the application fares in multiple browsers.
  • Whether it is performed by QA or any other team- the results are interpreted by the design and development teams and the relevant changes are made.

How to Perform Cross Browser Testing?

First things first- is it done manually or using a tool?

It can surely be done manually- multiple machines, multiple OSs, Multiple browsers, multiple machines and but clearly, this leads to multiple problems, multiple investments and multiple challenges.

Manual Method

In this case, a business identifies the browsers that the application must support. Testers then re-run the same test cases using different browsers and observe the application’s behavior and report bugs if any.

In this type of testing, it is not possible to cover many browsers and, the application might not be tested on major browser versions.

Also, performing cross-browser check manually is costly and time-consuming too.

Automated Method

Cross-browser testing is basically running the same set of test cases multiple times on different browsers.

This type of repeated task is best suited for automation. Thus, it’s more cost and time effective to perform this testing by using tools.

So, lots of tools are available in the market to make this easier.

The tools help us with one or more or all the following depending on the tool itself and the licensing types:

  • They provide a VPN (Virtual Private machine) using which you can connect to remote machines and check the working and rendition of your JAVA, AJAX, HTML, Flash and other pages. Most of these are secure, but since you are submitting your information to a third party, a certain analysis on discretion is advised.
  • Screenshots are provided for the pages and links submitted of how they appear in multiple browsers. This is, of course, static.
  • Multiple browsers are synchronized with respect to operations performed on one and the results are presented browser wise.
  • Show the rendition of a page at multiple screen resolutions.
  • When a problem is encountered, a video or screenshots are recorded to transport the problem for further analysis.
  • Support generally is available for both web and mobile apps.
  • Private pages that require authentication to be accessed can also be tested
  • Local, within a private network/firewall pages, can be tested too.

When to Start this Testing?

The time to start Cross-Browser test completely depends on your testing methodology and your testing timeline.

1. As soon as possible:

Start this testing even when a single page is ready for testing.

Test that page on each browser. When the next page is available, test that also on multiple browsers. This will increase the efforts, but it will help to fix the errors as early as possible in the life cycle. Thus, fixing errors, in this case, is much cost-effective.

2. When the application is complete:

Start this testing when the application development is complete.

This will test the application on different browsers. Fixing the errors won’t be as cost-effective as in the above case but it will still help in fixing the errors before releasing the application to the users.

3. When the application is released:

This is the least favored time for performing a cross-browser test for your application. But it’s better to do it than to not do it and let the end-users have a bad experience.

After the application is released for the end-users, this testing can be performed, and bugs can be fixed as a part of the change requests in the application. This is very costly and requires multiple deployments depending on the bug fixes.

Rigorous cross-browser testing can only be done when the testing team members who have knowledge of tools do this testing. High level or checking some specific browsers can also be done by business users or even developers.

This testing involves testing the application thoroughly using different browsers. Testing thoroughly includes functional and non-functional testing of the application.

In most of the companies, a product team has separate teams for functional and non-functional testing. Thus, this testing needs to be performed by the team(s) who is (are) responsible for functional and non-functional testing of the application.

For this testing, a tester needs the browsers on which the application needs to be tested.

These browsers can either be provided to the tester as:

  • Locally installed on tester’s machine.
  • A virtual machine or different machines which a tester has access to.
  • Tools which provide their own browsers and their versions for testing.
  • On cloud – so that multiple testers can use the browsers as and when required.

This testing is independent of the deployment environments. Thus, it can be done in dev, test, QA or even production environment depending upon the availability of the application in each of these environments.

What to Test?

  • Base Functionality – Links, dialogs, menus etc.
  • Graphical User Interface – Look and feel of the application.
  • Response – How well the application responds to user actions.
  • Performance – Loading of the pages within allowed the time frame.

If your application works well on one browser, that doesn’t imply that it will work well on the other browsers too. Thus, this testing helps you to ensure that an application runs on different browsers without any errors.

To identify what breaks on which browser and to fix the website accordingly we need to perform this testing. If a browser is not at all supported, then the users can easily be informed about it.

To summarize “how” to cross-browser test:

  • Traffic statistics help determine what browsers to test.
  • A detailed analysis should be done on the AUT (Application under test) itself to determine what parts of the application or if all of it must undergo this. It is advisable that all of it be tested on multiple browsers, but again costs and time must be considered.  “A good strategy is to perform 100% testing on one browser per platform and for the other just test the most critical/widely used functionality“.
  • Once the decision of “What” to test and “Where (browsers)” is made- infrastructure decisions are to be made- do we acquire tools or perform this manually etc. Again, the cost must be considered. Viability, risks, security concerns, people to be involved, time, acceptance criteria, issue/defect fixing schedules/process – are few things that must be addressed.
  • Perform the testing. The regular functional testing test cases can be used when validating the efficiency of the system. For look-and-feel/rendition test cases are not necessary.
  • The operation I was talking about at the beginning of this article that failed for me was an online bank transfer. I logged into my bank account, chose the amount for transfer as about one lakh and tried to perform the transfer and a servlet error was showing up no matter how many times I tried.

So, if the transfer operation is chosen for browser compatibility testing, this is how the test script is going to look like.

  • Log in to the online bank account.
  • Select the account from which the transfer is to be done.
  • Enter the transfer amount: 100,000.
  • Select payee and click “Transfer”.
  • Expected result: The transfer should be successful.
  • This will simply be run on all the browsers chosen.

Again, please note that this does not look different to a functional test case. Please check this non-functional testing article for further information on this.

Report the results back to the design team, if they were not involved in the testing process. Change follows.

When is the best time to do this?

Any testing reaps the best benefits when it is done early on. Therefore, the industry recommendation is to start with it as soon as the page designs are available.

But it also can be performed when the site is fully integrated and functional.

If you have missed the bus on performing the cross-browser test during design, development and QA phases, it can still be done while the application is in production. However, this is the costliest of all and risky too.

Where is browser compatibility testing performed?

Usually, the answer to this question would be one of- Dev/QA/Production environments. But for cross-browser checking, this is not a definite and irrelevant (if I may say so). It can be done in any one or all of them.

Conclusion

A few points to note, 

  • Having been a QA teacher for a while now, I can tell what’s coming next and that is –the question, is it functional and non-functional testing? I think it is neither and both.
  • It also should not be confused with Cross-Platform testing, which is testing your application in multiple target environments like Windows, Linux, Mac etc. Although sometimes the two must integrate as some of the older browser versions might be compatible only with the older versions of the platforms.
  • It is also a continues to process as software environments, browsers and devices are evolving every day and to make sure there are no unpleasant surprises, this browser Testing should be added to the repertoire of regression suites.

As you know, each type of testing helps in improving the quality of the application and so does the cross-browser test too.

Cross-browser testing helps in creating a good impression on the users by providing them a consistent experience throughout the application irrespective of the browser or Operating system.

Fixing bugs is cost-effective during the early stages of the development lifecycle, and the same applies to the defects found as a part of this testing too.

This testing helps in improving your business which in turn results in Happy Customers, Happy You!!

This is yet another testament to the concept that QA field or software testing is a multi-dimensional field and there is something for everyone to excel in.

Benefits of Automation Testing

Thursday, June 4th, 2020

Test automation can bring many benefits to your testing cycles, allowing you to test better with less effort. It is less time consuming as well! Many companies still run only manual tests because they don’t know how to properly integrate automated testing in their development process.

Automated testing means that a machine does, what a human used to do, quicker, with less errors, 24/7. Does it sound familiar?

Then, machines started to take over all the repetitive and boring tasks. Humans quickly tend to lose concentration with that kind of work or to overlook things that weren’t right. Machines are more reliable and faster in this.There’s also an obvious big starting investment when introducing change, especially this kind of change. Usually the smaller companies are afraid that the returns won’t be as expected or if there will be a ROI at all.

Back then people needed this kind of automation to produce the exact same parts that match perfectly with other parts so that the assembly could be done in less time and thus enhancing the production.

Well, let’s have a closer look at the top benefits of automated testing.

Benefits of Automation Testing

1. Return on Investment

Let’s start from the beginning: the big initial investment. This may be a hold back for many, but it is proven that the return of that investment is a long-term one and it will also save time.

ROI – benefits of automated testing

2. Early Bug Detection: 

Unlike manual testing, bugs can be detected early during the development phase in an automated testing which saves a lot of time during lifecycle for both developers and testers.

Automation helps you find bugs in the early stages of software development, reducing expenses and working hours to fix these problems as well.

3. Running Tests Anytime, Anywhere:

No matter where you are in the world. You can start the tests when you leave the office and when you get back in the morning you can see the results and keep on working. You can even do that remotely if you don’t have a lot of devices or you don’t have the money to buy it.

4. Fewer Human Resources:

You don’t need a lot of people: you would need a test automation engineer to write your scripts to automate your tests, instead of a lot of people doing boring manual tests repeatedly.

5. Reusability of Scripts:

The scripts are reusable:

You don’t need new scripts all the time, even if the version of the OS on the device changes

It allows you to redo the test the same, without forgetting any steps

6. Testing Capabilities:

Automation testing offers an unmatched and huge testing capability. The mobile app needs to be tested on multiple devices, OS versions, screen sizes etc. which can be efficiently done through automated testing and not by manual testing. In fact, it is almost impossible to get perfect results through manual testing.

7. Reliability:

Automated testing is more reliable and way quicker when running boring repetitive standardized tests which cannot be skipped, ever, but may cause errors when manually tested.

8. Improves Accuracy:

We have been saying this time and again that automation testing overcomes the shortcomings of manual testing. It has improved the accuracy to a great deal by giving error-free results unlike manual testing where testing is error-prone, delays the delivery and increases the cost. It is especially a boon in stress testing where getting error free results in manual testing is almost impossible.

9. Simultaneously:

You can test more devices simultaneously resulting in comparative detailed reports generated in less time with the exact the same parameters, because the exact same scripts were run.

10. Better Test Coverage:

Test automation can easily execute thousands of different complex test cases during every test run providing coverage that is impossible with manual tests. It can only be possible through automated testing as it can run test scripts on multiple computers with varied configurations. It can look inside an application and see memory contents, data tables, file contents, and internal program states to determine if the app is functioning as expected.

11. Continuity:

Automated testing helps testers, such as automation engineers. They can see exactly what other engineers have done, what scripts he has already written and what tests have already been performed and what bugs were already found and fixed, through clear reports.

12. Additional methods:

One of these methods is the stress test in which the capacities of the application and operational infrastructure will be tested to its limits with stress test, which can’t be done manually.

13. Volume:

You can run your tests on more than 500 devices in automation testing which is impossible in manual testing. Testing all of them manually would be impossible!

14. Information Security:

The effectiveness of testing will be largely dependent on the quality of the test data you use. Manually creating quality test data takes time and as a result testing is often performed on copies of live databases. Automation solutions can help with creating, manipulating and protecting your test database, allowing you to re-use your data time and again. The time and cost savings in this area are potentially huge.

Conclusion

Automation testing not only helps in saving time and improving accuracy, it does value addition to all the stakeholders involved in the app development lifecycle. Although testing automation offers such huge benefits, but many organizations have not adopted it in its entirety because of its initial cost associated with its configuration. With Agile testing and DevOps methodologies being widely followed in the IT industry, it is advisable to automate your testing

processes completely with renowned automated testing tools to get the best results.

In conclusion there are benefits and drawbacks to both automated and manual testing. This article had the purpose to show how automated testing can help you to make your testing more efficient.

To achieve the best results, you will need a combination of both types: automated testing for repetitive, simple use-cases; and manual testing for reproducing specific bugs, complicated use cases and to ensure the best user experience possible.

API Testing and How to do it?

Thursday, January 23rd, 2020

Introduction

Before getting into what API testing is, it is essential to understand what an API is. An API (Application Programming Interface) indicates how two software programs should integrate with one another.

API (Application programming interfaces) testing is a kind of software testing that involves testing APIs directly and as part of integration testing and to determine if they meet the requirements of functionality, performance, security, and reliability. API testing is a form of Black Box testing and is conducted after the build is ready. The source code is not included here.

The Challenge

To test the APIs and the integrations, they enable a software system.

The solution

To perform API testing, a tool is required to structure and manage the test cases. Another requirement is full traceability of requirements and effective API documentation.

During API testing, certain bugs can be found. These bugs include:

  • Duplicate or missing functionality
  • Incompatibility of the error handling mechanism
  • Reliability issues
  • Security and performance issues
  • Improper messaging
  • Multi-threaded issues

The quality assurance team performs API testing. The testing is conducted after the build is ready. The source code will not be included here.

A request is sent to the API to analyze responses that include:

  • Accuracy of data
  • HTTP status code
  • Error codes of any errors that are returned by API
  • Results of non-functional tests like security and performance
  • Response time
  • Authorization checks

Use a test management tool that will help in API testing by letting you structure and categorize your test cases. The tool should also give you full requirements traceability along with high-level API documentation. During API testing, the following must be kept in mind:

  • The API must be tested to check what happens and what does not happen on a consistent basis.
  • Stress testing on the system must be performed through several API load tests.
  • The API must be tested for failures. Test the API consistently so that it fails consistently.
  • Group all the test cases by category.
  • Mention all the parameters that are selected in the test case.
  • Prioritize API function calls so that testing can be simplified and can be finished on time.
  • Make plans to perform call sequencing.
  • Create test cases for different and all API input combinations that are possible. This way, you can ensure that you get complete test coverage.
  • Reuse the test cases and also monitor the API when in production.
  • It depends on the manual and automated tests if you want better API testing outcomes.

API testing is a very important part of software quality assurance. With the right approach and the right tools, you can ensure it is carried out successfully. The more API testing is structured, the better will be the outcomes of the testing.

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