Archive for the ‘Services’ Category

Mobile App ideas to consider using Javascript(Js)

Monday, August 31st, 2020

JavaScript is the most popular language on our planet. Even back-end developers who write server-side code tend to research more questions on JavaScript than any other language. That’s because JS is pretty inescapable. One of the most powerful things you can do with JS is to build mobile apps for both Android and iPhone. Here are some JavaScript frameworks and mobile app ideas that you can use.

Build hybrid mobile apps

Hybrid apps merge components of the web and native applications. They are a mobile version of a website that runs on a web browser. Unlike Safari, Chrome, or Firefox, this is a default browser that does not use an address bar. They are cross-platform compatible and can run on multiple mobile operating systems.

JavaScript frameworks that can be used to create hybrid mobile apps include Phonegap, Sencha touch, Onsen UI, and Ionic.

Build native mobile apps

These apps work with only one component for an operating system. Some components of a native app will change as the features of the operating system change; for example, buttons and preloaders. These apps are written in programming languages like Objective C for iOS and Java for Android operating systems. The advantage of native apps is that they are fast and reliable when compared to hybrid mobile apps.

Today, you can use a JavaScript framework to build native mobile apps that are cross-platform compatible. You can convert a JavaScript code to render the native components to the platform it runs on.

Here is a list of JavaScript frameworks you can use to build native apps.

React Native

An open-source framework that has been created and maintained by Facebook. Although not a new framework, it is one of the most popular. You can create an entire mobile app using only JavaScript. It uses the same design as React and lets you build a rich mobile user interface from declarative components. Apps built using React Native include Instagram, Uber, Facebook, and Walmart.

Tabris.js

Build native iOS and Android apps from a single code with Tabris.js. If you know how to use PhoneGap and/or Ionic, you won’t have trouble using tabris.js, and it won’t be a difficult destination to migrate. Tabris.js follows the same format as PhoneGap and Ionic config.xml.

Native script

For great UI performance, Telerik Native Script is just right. This open-source framework allows you to build both Android and iOS mobile apps.

Of all the above apps, Tabris.js framework is definitely the best as it also supports cloud build without the requirement of huge SDK installations that consume both space and memory.

Manual Vs Automation Testing

Thursday, June 11th, 2020

In this article we are going to talk about advantages of Automation Testing over Manual testing.

What is Manual Testing and Automation Testing?

Manual testing is performed by hand. Quality Assurance (QA) specialists ensure that applications work properly by following conditions written in test cases. Despite its primitive nature, manual testing is still important, as certain functionality simply cannot be automatically tested. For example, wearables and mobile devices can require field testing in a physical environment. Mobile applications often undergo ‘monkey tests’ that detect bottlenecks during unpredicted stressful conditions. For instance, what happens if a user forgets a mobile device in their pocket with an application running and they tap the screen unintentionally? Is it possible that they’ll crash the app? Only manual testing can account for these scenarios.

Automation testing is a Software testing technique to test and compare the actual outcome with the expected outcome. This can be achieved by writing test scripts or using any automation testing tool. Test automation is used to automate repetitive tasks and other testing tasks which are difficult to perform manually

Now let’s discuss automated and manual testing in detail.

Automation Testing:

As per Industry standards and specialization our QA team automates the following types of testing:

Unit Testing is a level of software testing where individual units/ components of the software are tested. The purpose is to validate that each unit of the software performs as designed. A unit is the smallest testable part of any software. It usually has one or a few inputs and usually a single output.

Functional Testing is Software testing performed in order to detect the actual performance of an application’s functional requirements. Functional testing usually considers accuracy, interoperability, compliance, security, and suitability.

Regression Testing is defined as a type of software testing to confirm that a recent program or code change has not adversely affected existing features. Regression Testing is nothing but a full or partial selection of already executed test cases which are re-executed to ensure existing functionalities work fine

Graphical user interface (GUI) testing of software interfaces to check if the GUI meets all requirements.

These are the most common types of testing that we automate. Manual testing requires people and time, while automated testing reduces the demand on both resources. Also, automatic tests eliminate the risk of human error, making code more reliable. Now let’s see what tasks we can solve by automated testing.

Why you need automated testing?

Automated Testing Saves Time and Money

Software tests have to be repeated often during development cycles to ensure quality. Every time source code is modified software tests should be repeated.  Automated software testing can reduce the time to run repetitive tests from days to hours.

To handle repetitive tasks. If you’re constantly adding the same features or executing the same operations in a project, then the flexible nature of automated tests can be a great time saver.

To eliminate human error. Since automated tests are powered by tools and scripts, the chance of missing a bug or a defect decrease. This makes the testing process more reliable and time efficient.

For advanced GUI testing. Automated GUI tests detect and record differences in behavior between platforms — for example, across different web browsers or operating systems. Also, automated GUI testing effectively finds regression errors.

To test load and performance. There’s essentially no manual alternative for testing load and performance. Automated tests simulate hundreds and thousands of simultaneous users.

Why do you need Manual Testing?

Despite the seemingly broad coverage of automated testing, manual testing shouldn’t be underestimated. In fact, you have to test software manually before you run automated testing. Even though manual testing requires much effort, without it you cannot be sure that automation is possible. One of the key testing principles is that 100% testing automation is impossible. Manual testing is still necessary.

Let’s see which tests cannot be automated (or would take too much effort to automate):

Ad hoc testing is executed without preparation and writing test cases. During ad hoc testing, a QA specialist randomly tests the functionality of the system; his aim is to be creative, “break” the system and discover flaws.

Exploratory testing is defined as simultaneous learning, test design, and test execution. It is an approach to testing that values the tester as an integral part of the test process and shares the same values as the Agile Manifesto: Individuals and interactions over processes and tools. That’s how exploratory testing differs from ad hoc testing: in exploratory testing, you rely on your personal experience and design test cases in the testing process. An ad hoc testing can be done by any person without preparation.

User interface testing – By executing user interface tests, a QA specialist validates the properties and states of interface elements. Also, the QA team ensures that design elements in the interface match elements in the final layout.

As we can see, some tests should be performed manually. This especially relates to tests that focus on user interfaces and usability. Although we could automate basically everything, manual testing still provides an effective and quality check of bugs and improprieties.

The cases where manual testing has no comparison

UI Acceptance- Manual testing comes in handy when you test user interfaces, especially their visual aspects. Automated tests simply cannot detect colors of images or links, font sizes, gestures, and highlighting. Imagine that your application has a bug that causes a link to be so tiny that you can barely see it. Manual testers will immediately detect this bug, but automated tests are not able to notice the defect.

Initial development stage- Manual testing helps testers to detect bottlenecks during the initial development stage which results in less time and resources being spent on fixing bugs. Sometimes it’s not rational to invest money and human resources in automated testing during an unstable phase of a product’s development. However, in some approaches to software development, automated testing is a part of the process at any stage.

Short-term projects-Even though automated tests are aimed at saving time and resources, it takes time and resources to design and maintain them. In some cases, such as building a small promotional website, it can be much more efficient to rely on manual testing.

Non-automatable cases-Some tests cannot be automated; this especially concerns hardware-related tests. Writing scripts for automated checks of sensors, touchpads, and screens are almost impossible and rarely viable. Also, some data can be tested only manually. For example, you can automatically test if printer prints, but checking the quality and content of printed images is best done manually.

Conclusion

Manual Vs Automation Testing each have their strengths and weaknesses. What we want to stress is that no matter how great automated tests are, you cannot automate everything. Manual tests play an important role in software development and come in handy whenever you cannot automate the process.

Google Analytics, Amplitude or Mixpanel

Friday, January 24th, 2020

Know the right tool for your Business

With the increasing emphasis on data-driven business optimization choosing an appropriate analytics tool has never been more important.

There are a bunch of analytics tools available in the market. These tools can all look the same, and some of the similar terminologies might be confusing.

Analysis of data is something every size of business requires these days. We will look at 3 of the most talked-about tools available in the market. Looking at just three might help you decide which one will work for your business or organization.

Say hello to Mixpanel

Mixpanel came into the market in 2009 and gradually it became popular. Mixpanel is a tool that majorly focuses on the post sign up of the website and the events performed by the various users, it tracks every event performed by the users. It allows focusing on each user specifically. Some of the major feature provided by Mixpanel is user analytics, create funnels, analyze retention cohorts and flesh out user journeys and many other recurring feature names you have heard of associated with analytical tools.

The analysis provided by Mixpanel has events that take place on the webpages of your site, like adding to cart or completing a form or downloads — anything that can be done, it can be measured.

Mixpanel divides the data in segments triggered by the events into the users who took this action. It certainly makes the bulk of data that can be collected into much more digestible chunks. This segmentation-first approach to the analytics of data is the main focus of the UI/UX.

A/B testing is a feature that you have heard of more often when it is about analytical tools, this feature allows you to measure the success of two variations of your site content, then implementing the most successful one. It’s a better solution than creating a page, giving it a week to measure success, and then amend it, and so repeating that until you’re satisfied with the results.

You can specify an event you want to measure, and Mixpanel will analyze data from user journeys that previously completed that event to predict the chances of future users completing the event at the end of the same user journey. It will provide you with scores for it.

Mixpanel can be sued by any beginner easily. Everything is crystal clear, and everything is pretty much where it is expected to be. It’s got the usual to see left-hand navigation pane, and all the menu titles there are largely self-explanatory.

When you first start off, you can have a tutorial video explaining each feature of the navigation pane, explaining what it does, and how it will help you when you’re trying to understand your data. It depends on the user whether these are useful or not — some people really just want to read about it with some screenshots.

Say hello to Amplitude

Amplitude is similar to Mixpanel, but their product has a more modern feel. Like Mixpanel, they focus on what happens after a user signs up and what users are doing inside your product.

They are a great option for e-commerce companies and companies who have cross-platform products. Amplitude also takes an event-focused approach to their data collection, and the analytical outcomes of this are many.

What Amplitude seems to take the most pride in though, is the visualization of the data it collects, in presenting you with bite-sizes of digestible and actionable information.

You can customize a lot of these chunks of information to suit yourself, but it does come with a bunch of default ones. I’m talking about things like customer retention, the ability to view real-time actions, and managing your analytics using a marketing funnel.

Amplitude’s usability and the interface can be best described as ‘positive.’

From the bright colors used in the design of the user interface, through to the tone of voice used in the instructions when you take the initial demo tour, it is easy to get to.

You know in a movie when they have Parallel universe or dream in dream sequence, where everything is all positive, to the extent that the subject gets suspicious? It’s like that, except I couldn’t find anything negative, and wasn’t pulled out of it with a shock.

It’s got the standard left-hand navigation pane, and the demo tour will take you through each one of those, explaining what they do. The various graphs and charts make great use of color to help with their clarity.

Say hello to Google Analytics

Google Analytics is a general audience overview, telling you top-level information, such as how many visitors your website overall has had, where they have been located and what language they’ve been using.

Besides the user-centric stuff, you can look at all kinds of things. You can check which pages on your website have been the most popular. You can get a breakdown of the sources from which people got to your website, so whether it was from an organic search, paid search, or social media.

From social media, you can drill down to the specific networks, so whether it was Facebook or Twitter or whatever.

You can get as detailed as you want with the data. For example, you could see how many people came to your website from Facebook, what time they did so at, their age and gender, and generally what they looked at.

One of the key features is the link to AdWords so that you can see directly how much money your Google PPC ad spend is generating in conversions. In a time when ROI is a repeated question from management, it’s good to be able to see it straight away

People new to analytics might be surprised by the depth of the data that can be gathered.

Google Analytics wouldn’t have such a high market share if its usability was like solving Rubik’s cube (of course at first), haha :).

The layout and navigation make sense. Google does offer certification in Analytics, which is useful for getting the most out of it.

By creating custom URLs and a campaign with Google Analytics, you can get more detailed information about who has been clicking through to your website from your email: where they were, what time they clicked through at, and what they did from there.

Doctor Strange stuff huh!

The main thing about Google Analytics is that it gives you all the information you need, but how it’s used will depend on the confidence of the person using it, and how much time the organization wants to allocate to data analysis.

Here is the feature and Integrations comparison between Google Analytics, Amplitude, and Mixpanel in the tabular representation so that you can give you an add-on to compare and decide which one is best suited for your data.

Conclusion

There are so many businesses can learn about their customers today. The amount of data that can be collected is enormous and the company which is willing to take advantage of it are making moves to be on top.

So, which tool you should use? Well, the answer is hidden in your business. Depending on the company — its size, audience, life stage, and goals — the data analytics suite that’s the best fit may be different from what the rival company or company across the street is using.

NeTFacilities| An AMT Direct Company

Thursday, January 23rd, 2020

Product introduction

NETFacilities is a part of the AMTdirect group. The company helps businesses manage their facilities and assets by deploying efficient solutions. The company also provides companies with expert resources to manage their assets and facilities. NETFacilities has created the ultimate maintenance and management solution and now services more than 14,000 locations and thousands of users.

Domain: Service ERP

Platform: Mobile App

The aim of the project

The goal was to rebuild a Mobile App with the same functionality as a mobile forms app. We were to also include a tastefully-designed dashboard within the app. The app had to be created together with UI and UX professionals, who would be able to design the dashboard.

The mobile app was to be based on a subscription model as it contained certain features that were available only after payment or a paid subscription.

We were to create the Mobile ERP App from scratch while reusing the existing code of Xamarin Forms by converting it into Xamarin Native.

The challenges we faced

The first challenge that we faced was to create an entire platform right from scratch and automate certain processes. These processes were earlier managed and controlled via a mobile app at an enterprise level.

The second challenge was to reuse the existing code that was specifically written in Xamarin Forms. Xamarin Forms are especially used to build native apps. Reusing the Xamarin Forms code was difficult.

A third challenge was to frequently change the way we worked on the project, as the client was not familiar with the Agile framework.

Solution

We created a mobile app version of AMT direct using agile methodology, with scrum implementation.

We made additional suggestions to the client based on our understanding of their requirements. These suggestions were much appreciated and were taken on board.

We implemented Google Analytics that would help NetFacilities to measure the user bounce rate on the Mobile App, and also to help them boost their sales.

Since the end-users are in the minimum age category of 45–50, we developed the entire Mobile App from Xamarin Native to give the users a better and seamless user experience. The user interface was designed so that the end-user had no problems using the interface.

Project impact

We were able to do much more than just create a Mobile ERP App for NETFacilities. We also provided the company with ideas to manage the assets, assessments, domains, work orders through a well-designed dashboard. The dashboard is easy to use and sits within the app that boasts of an easy-to-use user interface and superb user experience.

We also included features like signature capture, offline/online sync, and on-the-fly sync to increase the usage and flexibility of the platform.

A Beginner’s Guide to Progressive Web Apps

Thursday, January 23rd, 2020

A Progressive Web App, also known as PWA, is a web app that “uses modern web capabilities to deliver an app-like experience.” It combines the best of both web apps and mobile apps. While it may be developed using web technologies, a PWA developed by a good app design agency feels and acts like a mobile app.

For instance, if you browse certain websites on your mobile browser, you might have come across a pop-up banner asking you if you want to add the website to your home screen. If you choose “Add to Home Screen”, then the “app” installs by itself in the background without you ever having to go to the app store in order to download it to your phone. After the installation is done, you can access the same content on the same platform in a similar experience, but this time through your phone without requiring a browser.

This is what a Progressive Web App is. It allows you to download a mobile app from a web application by combining the best of both worlds, and even works offline, similar to a native mobile app. This means that you can browse the content even if you do not have internet access.

What is the function of Progressive Web Apps?

Native mobile apps found in app stores are able to carry out certain functions like working offline, loading on the home screen, and sending push notifications. Apart from this, another key difference from web applications is that native mobile apps have that distinct experience of looking and feeling like an app.

However, browser mobile web apps, which can be accessed using a browser in mobile phones, do not have the qualities mentioned above. This is where Progressive Web Apps come in. When these apps are developed by a UI UX design company, a set of best practices is used to make web applications work and feel like native mobile apps from app stores.

User experiences are delivered through progressive enhancement by top UX design firms, which means that regardless of which system you use, you will still be able to access content easily and smoothly. Even if there are some features that may not be available, user experience is not compromised with a PWA. It allows the app to perform and function exactly the way it should.

So, in other words, the goal of a Progressive Web App is to be able to deliver an experience that is so smooth, seamless, and uniform that users cannot differentiate between a PWA and a native mobile app.

Connecting GraphQL using Apollo Server

Thursday, January 23rd, 2020

Introduction

Apollo Server is a library that helps you connect a GraphQL schema to an HTTP server in Node.js. We will try to explain this through an example, the link used to clone this project is mentioned below:-

git clone https://[email protected]/prwl/apollo-tutorial.git

This technology and its concepts can be best explained as below.

Challenge

Here, one of the main goals is to create a directory and install packages. This will eventually lead us to implement our first subscription in GraphQL with Apollo Server and PubSub.

Solution

For this, the first step includes building a new folder in your working directory. The current directory is changed to that new folder, and a new folder is created to hold your server code in and run. This will create the package.json file for us. After this, we install a few libraries. After the installment of these packages, the next step is to create an index.js file in the root of the server.

Create Directory

npm init -y

Install Packages

npm install apollo-server-express express graphql nodemon apollo-server

Connecting Apollo Server

Index.js first connects to the Apollo server. Every library is set to get started with the source code in the index.js file. To achieve this, you have first to import the necessary parts for getting started with Apollo Server in Express. Using Apollo Server’s applyMiddleware() method, you can opt-in any middleware, which in this case is Express.

import express from 'express';
import { ApolloServer, gql } from 'apollo-server-express';

const typeDefs = gql`
type Query {
hello: String
};
const resolvers = {
Query: {
hello: () => 'Hello World!'
}
}
`;
const server = new ApolloServer({ typeDefs, resolvers });
const app = express();
server.applyMiddleware({ app });

app.listen({ port: 4000 }, () =>
console.log(`? Server ready at http://localhost:4000${server.graphqlPath}`)
);

The GraphQL schema provided to the Apollo Server is the only available data for reading and writing data via GraphQL. It can happen from any client who consumes the GraphQL API. The schema consists of type definitions, which starts with a mandatory top-level Query type for reading data, followed by fields and nested fields. Apollo Server has various scalar types in the GraphQL specification for defining strings (String), booleans (Boolean), integers (Int), and more.

const typeDefs = gql`
type Query {
hello: Message
}Type Message {salutation: String}
`;
const resolvers = {
Query: {
hello: () => 'Hello World!'
}
};

In the GraphQL schema for setting up an Apollo Server, resolvers are used to return data for fields from the schema. The data source doesn’t matter, because the data can be hardcoded, can come from a database, or from another (RESTful) API endpoint.

Mutations

So far, we have only defined queries in our GraphQL schema. Apart from the Query type, there are also Mutation and Subscription types. There, you can group all your GraphQL operations for writing data instead of reading it.

const typeDefs = gql`
type Query {

}type Mutation {createMessage(text: String!): String!}
`;

As visible from the above code snippet. In this case, the create message mutation accepts a non-nullable text input as an argument and returns the created message as a string.

Again, you have to implement the resolver as counterpart for the mutation the same as with the previous queries, which happens in the mutation part of the resolver map:

const resolvers = {
Query: {
hello: () => ‘Hello World!’
},
Mutation: {
createMessage: (parent, args) => {
const message = args.text;
return message;
},
},
};

The mutation’s resolver has access to the text in its second argument. The parent argument isn’t used.

So far, the mutation creates a message string and returns it to the API. However, most mutations have side-effects, because they are writing data to your data source or performing another action. Most often, it will be a write operation to your database, but in this case, we are just returning the text passed to us as an argument.

That’s it for the first mutation. You can try it right now in GraphQL Playground:

mutation {
createMessage (text: “Hello GraphQL!”)
}

The result for the query should look like this as per your defined sample data:

{
“data”: {
“createMessage”: “Hello GraphQL!”
}
}

Subscriptions

So far, you used GraphQL to read and write data with queries and mutations. These are the two essential GraphQL operations to get a GraphQL server ready for CRUD operations. Next, you will learn about GraphQL Subscriptions for real-time communication between GraphQL client and server.

Apollo Server Subscription Setup

Because we are using Express as middleware, expose the subscriptions with an advanced HTTP server setup in the index.js file:

import http from ‘http’;…server.applyMiddleware({ app, path: ‘/graphql’ });const httpServer = http.createServer(app);
server.installSubscriptionHandlers(httpServer);httpServer.listen({ port: 8000 }, () => {
 console.lo;
});…

To complete the subscription setup, you’ll need to use one of the available PubSub engines for publishing and subscribing to events. Apollo Server comes with its own by default.

Let’s implement the specific subscription for the message creation. It should be possible for another GraphQL client to listen to message creations.

Create a file named subscription.js in the root directory of your project and paste the following line in that file:

import { PubSub } from ‘apollo-server’;export const CREATED = ‘CREATED’;export const EVENTS = {
MESSAGE: CREATED,
};export default new PubSub();

The only piece missing is using the event and the PubSub instance in your resolver.

…import pubsub, { EVENTS } from ‘./subscription’;…const resolvers = {
Query: {

},
Mutation: {…
},Subscription: {messageCreated: {subscribe: () => pubsub.asyncIterator(EVENTS.MESSAGE),},},};…

Also, update your schema for the newly created Subscription:

const typeDefs = gql`
type Query {

}
type Mutation {

}type Subscription {messageCreated: String!}
`;

The subscription as a resolver provides a counterpart for the subscription in the message schema. However, since it uses a publisher-subscriber mechanism (PubSub) for events, you have only implemented the subscribing, not the publishing. It is possible for a GraphQL client to listen for changes, but there are no changes published yet. The best place for publishing a newly created message is in the same file as the created message:

…import pubsub, { EVENTS } from ‘./subscription’;…const resolvers = {
Query: {

},
Mutation: {
createMessage: (parent, args) => {
const message = args.text;pubsub.publish(EVENTS.MESSAGE, {messageCreated: message,});
return message;
},
},
Subscription: {

},
};…

We have implemented your first subscription in GraphQL with Apollo Server and PubSub. To test it, create a new message on a tab in the apollo playground. On the other tab, we can listen to our subscription.

In the first tab, execute the subscription:

subscription {
messageCreated
}

In the second tab execute the createMessage mutation:

mutation {
createMessage(text: “My name is John.”)
}

Now, check the first tab(subscription) for the response like this:

{
“data”: {
“messageCreated”: “My name is John.”
}
}

We have implemented GraphQL subscriptions.

Salesforce Data Migration Best Practices

Thursday, January 23rd, 2020

Introduction

Salesforce data migration is the process of moving or migrating Salesforce data to other platforms. The migration is a way of cleaning the data. The data should be:

  • Complete — contain all the necessary details for all users
  • Relevant — Required information should be included
  • Timely — The data should be available when needed
  • Accessible — the data should be accessible immediately
  • Valid — the data should be in the correct format
  • Reliable — the data should be authentic
  • Unique — There should be no duplicate records

The challenge

To migrate data in Salesforce from one organization to another or from one division to another.

The Solution:

Define which method is best suited to import/export your data. Then, understand the most effective practices for organizing and migrating that data.

1. Begin by identifying the data that needs to be migrated.

Choose objects that need to be migrated.

You might want to migrate only the “contact information” from every account, or you might even want to migrate “account information” from a particular division.

2. Create templates for the data that needs to be migrated

An excel template must be created for each Object. This is done using a data export from Data Loader.

Objects have necessary relationships that dictate the order of data migration. So, identify the required fields for each Object.

3. Populate all the templates

Make sure to review the data before populating it in the template.

4. Prepare the destination org

You might want to create custom fields to store legacy ID information.

Optionally, you can give the custom field the “External ID” attribute, and it will be indexed. By doing this, relationships will be maintained, and you can build custom reports for data validation.

For data that is contained in non-standard fields in the old organization, consider creating custom fields.

5. Validate the data

The following techniques can be used to validate the migration:

  • Spot check the data
  • Review exception reports tracking any data that was not migrated
  • Create a custom report to validate record counts and provide you with a snapshot of the migration.

A few words of advice:

Before migrating the data with Salesforce, you should be sure of how the user IDs of the existing database match the new system.

Ensure you have at least a few licenses available for the old instance after the cut-off date. It will be a good idea to have a few months of accessibility left. So, if you face any issues with migration, you can always go back to the old instance and take your time to investigate the issues.

Keep an eye on the space that is being consumed.

Perform testing before rolling out the instance.

Finally, Salesforce data migration is a useful and important task to provide effective data solutions to an organization. However, it must be performed without affecting the quality of the data within the system.

Salesforce Lead Management Best Practices

Thursday, January 23rd, 2020

One of the key factors that determine the success of any business is its lead management practices. Salesforce is among the top CRM platforms that business use, helping you to convert leads into loyal customers. Here are some of the best Salesforce lead management practices that you should follow.

Define what leadership means to your business

The first step is to know your leads and for this, you need to clearly define who the perfect lead is for your business. The perfect lead will be different for every business, which means that it is imperative for every member of your team to be absolutely sure who your perfect lead is. You have to clearly identify their interests, problems, their preferred communication channel, and other behavioral traits.

Attract leads with targeted content

After you have successfully established who the perfect lead is, it is now time to attract them with targeted content. A study has found that companies that publishing blog articles generate 67 percent more leads, which should be good enough reason for you to create well-written, search engine optimized blog posts. Doing so not only helps you attract the exact audience you want but also helps to establish your company as an expert in your area.

Have a standardized lead management process

It is important that your company has a standardized lead management process so that everyone is on the same page. This helps to minimize errors too. Bring the entire team together and put together a distinct and comprehensive process for your lead management from start to finish.

Make use of automation solutions

Today, it is important for a business to have the right tech stack to help them streamline their activities and automate processes. Lead management can benefit greatly from automation solutions, especially when you automate the best-performing lead channels. This increases efficiency and saves a lot of time.

Have a lead scoring method in place

Lead scoring is important because it helps in monitoring the behavior of your prospects and their level of interest in the products or services that you offer. This helps you plan your marketing strategy better as you will be able to determine the amount of time and effort to spend on each lead.

Plan and implement a nurturing process

The nurturing process is an important part of salesforce lead management as it helps in building successful relationships with leads, while also retaining the lesser qualified leads for future interest. The nurturing process is often neglected, but shouldn’t be.

Boost Your Marketing Strategy with Chatbots

Thursday, January 23rd, 2020

Bots have become an integral part of a good digital marketing strategy. Every smart marketer knows that with bots, you can do more in less time. By automating certain basic tasks using bots, a business can allocate their resources more efficiently, while also reaping all the benefits that bots can offer.

Below, we talk about these benefits and why they are worth considering for your digital marketing strategy.

Helps you understand your customers better

Bots help to gain a better understanding of your customers as they provide an interactive way of engaging with customers. Besides, people feel much more comfortable sharing information with a bot than a real person. After collecting valuable data, they can even monitor customer behavior and look into their buying patterns so that businesses can plan their marketing strategies accordingly.

Suggest and sell products

Today, more people are shopping online than ever before, which means there is a huge potential for bots in sales. In fact, many huge brands have already started using chatbots to suggest products and services to users based on an analysis of their purchasing patterns. So, in other words, bots can act as the user’s personal shopping assistant, suggesting products that they are likely to purchase.

For instance, H&M already uses bots in their app to suggest a personalized collection of products which a customer is likely to buy. Not only does this help increase sales, but it also reduces scrolling time for a customer.

Follow up and engage with customers after-sale

It’s not just answering queries and suggesting products that bots are good for. They are used for outbound digital marketing as well. Even after the sale, bots can be sued to send follow up messages to customers and handle proactive customer engagement. This helps to ensure that your customers are satisfied with the product they have bought. It also shows customers that you really do care about their experience.

Improves overall customer experience

Bots are great because they can be employed in so many ways that increase overall customer experience. When users land on your site, having a chatbot that can efficiently answer all their queries and help solve their problems is a huge plus. For this, it is important that you make the bot sound human while designing it. Bots also help to deliver a personalized experience to customers, which is a huge factor in the purchasing decision of customers.

How to Design Great UI for Your Website

Thursday, January 23rd, 2020

Website design UI is an intricate discipline that dictates how users interact with your website and your brand. A good website should always focus on the user while they are on the site so that they can deliver a smooth and seamless user interface.

Below, we take a look at how you can deliver such an experience for a web design project.

Everything users need should be easily accessible

One of the most important rules to follow is to make everything easily accessible for the users. When people visit your website, they should be able to find everything they need quickly so that navigating through the site becomes easy. Otherwise, they will likely get frustrated and leave your site, thereby increasing your bounce rate.

This means that you should organize your tools using tabs, hover tooltips, shortcuts, etc. every option or button should be clearly labelled so as to avoid confusion.

Be smart about element placement and design

All the elements of your website should be well designed and strategically placed so that it supports a smooth UI. A common rule is that the most important functions should be placed at the top of the page so users don’t have to struggle to find them. They should also be larger and generally more prominent. When users scan a page, they usually go from left to right, and top to bottom, so make use of this when it comes to element placement.

Color and contrast, and whitespace are also important elements that can help guide users through your page.

Help users understand what is going on by giving feedback

By providing your users with feedback while they are on your site, you help them understand what is going on. For example, if they press a button that downloads something, you can notify them that the button was successfully clicked on by making the button appear to sink into the page. You can also let them know that the download is in progress by adding an icon that shows the download progress. The idea here is to assure your users by acknowledging that an action has been taken.

Follow design standards

This may sound simple and silly but it is something that many designers need to be reminded of. If design standards work well, there is no need to try something completely different. Visitors to your site are already used to certain design standards such as certain icons standing for something or element placements, and it’s best to carry over these standards to your site as well.

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